Ethnoecology

Birrka Marnini

Making Things Mudburra

Mudburra country is located in the middle of the Northern Territory. Our people live in Elliott and Marlinja. In this book we show you how we prepare some bush medicines such as bush vicks, and how we collect different tucker, such as hunting turkeys and collecting mussels. We also show you some of our country at Narrwan.

 

Jingulu and Mudburra Plants and Animals

Bicultural knowledge of the Jingili and Mudburra people of Murranji, Marlinja, Warranganku (Beetaloo) and Kulumindini (Elliott)

This landmark publication has been three years in the making and brings together the work of senior Jingulu and Mudburra elders in collaboration with a biologist and linguists. The focus on Jingulu and Mudburra names and uses for 186 plants and 245 animals represents the largest scope of its kind with the book existing as the Northern Territory Botanical Bulletin No. 49. Also featured is a section on related Jingulu and Mudburra hand signs with QR codes linking to videos of hand signing in action.

GIJA Plants and Animals

Aboriginal flora and fauna knowledge from the east Kimberley, north Australia

This book is the result of a study of Gija plant and animal knowledge conducted by biocultutral knowledge custodians with a linguist and biologist are presented. Gija names and uses of plants and animals, specific names and common English names of 215 plants and 247 animals are included. Introductory chapters outline Gija knowledge of seasons, nomenclature for implements, weapons and tools, plant life-forms, and habitats and provide insights into Gija observations of country changes and concerns about country. Gija biological knowledge is categorised and discussed in later chapters.

LANGUAGE, LAND AND SONG

Studies in honour of Luise Hercus

Language, land, stories and songs are closely entwined in many societies around the world. Documenting all of these is now recognised as an essential part of language work, and flows into contemporary concerns for making material accessible through language maintenance and archiving activities. 

Belaa Plants and Animals

Biocultural knowledge of the Kwini people of the far north Kimberley, Australia

This book mainly documents the Belaa language, however, any of the words used may be the same or similar to those used by people from the Forrest River area and other parts of Balanggarra country. 

This book is a powerful testament to the depth and complexity of the biocultural knowledge of the Kwini elders who wrote this book. It is also an indication of the successful passing-on of detailed plant and animal knowledge for thousands of generations. This book forms a new unbreakable link in a chain of knowledge tranmission reaching back to the Dreamtime.

NGUÑ KOONGURRUKUÑ

Speak Koongurrukuñ

'Language is the very essence of Aboriginal identity.' These are Ida Bishop's words and they embody the reason why this work is of such great importance. 

This work is important because it provides a written, permanent record of a rich indigenous language which would otherwise in time disappear with the passing on of its oral custodians.

It is important also because the author, as a speaker of the language, has produced a written form of Koongurrukuñ with a depth and sensitivity impossible for an outside researcher.

Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin Plants and Animals

Aboriginal biocultural knowledge from the Moyle river, plains and coast, north Australia

This book is a species rich and a culturally detailed account of the biocultural knowledge of the Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin people. It is a powerful testament to the knowledge of the senior authors, and a wonderful legacy for all future generations.

Language: 

Jirigi Jinda Ardangarri, Burnarri Anja, Diigu Aagala - Birds

Jirigi Jinda Ardangarri, Burnarri Anja, Diigu Aagala – Birds: tells us the names of birds in Ngarinyin, Worrorra and Wunambal Gaambara languages. The bird’s moiety, and the spiritual and seasonal knowledge associated with some birds gives an insight into the cultural importance of some birds for Ngarinyin, Worrorra and Wunambal Gaambara people. The amazing photographs generously donated by many photographers assist in enhancing the knowledge share by Elders.

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